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How do I clean my car?

Dear readers, today we would like to try to answer a really tricky question: “How do I clean my car?” The answer is much more ample than, “Well don’t litter it!”

A car is a good that requires a certain effort of maintenance, from technical check-ups to more… cosmetic measures, such as washing, cleaning and waxing. First, here are some tips:

1. Keep your car parked in a cool, sheltered place, preferably away from the sun. This will prevent the paint from fading and will prolong the results of the waxing.

2. Avoid using “hard water” – that is to say, water that has lots of minerals – because it can leave lots of spots on the paint as it evaporates.

3. When waxing the car, use only wax that is intended for cars and apply it with a microfiber towel.

4. When washing the car, avoid using dish or laundry soap. It can hurt the pain and the wax and damage the finishes.

5. Before waxing the car, wash it thoroughly. When cleaning it, you can try wheeling (polishing the car with a rotating wheel). Wheeling can be a bit messy – it sprinkles – so be sure to cover adjacent surfaces to avoid “contaminating” them.

When wheeling, cover the wheel of the machine with a damp pad that you can remove or clean as it gets saturated with foam. After you have finished wheeling the car, rinse it again and then proceed to waxing.

6. Apply wax and as the wax is drying, you can clean the other components of the car: windows or interior.

7. Be careful to remove the wax with a proper micro-fiber towel. Avoid bath towels or paper ones, which can scratch the surface.

Your car is all set! However, if after reading this you feel owning a car is too much of a fuss, you can always rent a car virtually anywhere in the world.

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